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How do I read Stem and Leaf plots?

I don´t understand this at all.

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Reading and Interpreting Stem and Leaf Diagrams - Examples ...


Read and interpret stem and leaf ... Reading and Interpreting Stem and Leaf ... Tutorial on how to read and interpret stem and leaf diagrams. Example 1: The stem and ...
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Stem-and-leaf plots (video) | Khan Academy


The 'stem' is on the left displays the first ... 543 and 548 can be displayed together on a stem and leaf as 54 ... Reading stem and leaf plots. Next tutorial. ...
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Stem-and-Leaf Plots | Purplemath


Stem-and-leaf plots are a method for showing the frequency with which certain classes of ... I'll use the tens digits as the stem values and the ones digits as the ...
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Math Video | Stem and Leaf Plots | MathPlayground.com


Math video explains how to read a stem and leaf plot. advertisement Math Video How to Read a Stem and Leaf Plot. advertisement. Math Games and Activities
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Reading stem and leaf plots (practice) | Khan Academy


Khan Academy is a nonprofit with the mission of providing a free, ... Practice: Reading stem and leaf plots. Next tutorial. Picture graphs, bar graphs, and histograms.
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What is the Stem and Leaf Plot? An Overview - ThoughtCo


What does this Stem and Leaf Plot Show? The tens column is now in the middle and the ones column is to the right and left of the stem column. You can see that the ...
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How do you read stem and leaf plots? + Example - Socratic


How do you read stem and leaf plots? ... For the leaves on the left all you do is read it backwards. So, the lowest score for Class A was 60, ...
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Stem and Leaf Plots - Math is Fun


Stem and Leaf Plots. A Stem and Leaf Plot is a special table where each data value is split into a "stem" ... Say what the stem and leaf mean (Stem "2" Leaf "3" means ...
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Stemplots (aka, Stem and Leaf Plot) - stattrek.com


Stemplots (aka, Stem and Leaf Plots) ... A different kind of graphical display, called a stemplot or a stem and leaf plot , does show exact ...
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How to Make a Stem and Leaf Plot - Tutorial - ThoughtCo


See how to make a stem and leaf plot, a useful way to organize data while retaining all of the data values. ... The data can be easily read from the stemplot.
Read More At : www.thoughtco.com...

Suggested Questions And Answer :


How do I read Stem and Leaf plots?

Stem and Leaf plots are just a method of ordering data in a dataset to produce a frequency chart. The usual way this is done is to use part of each datum to create a data bin. Let's imagine a dataset where all the data consists of numbers between 1 and 99. It doesn't matter how big the dataset is or if there are duplicates. Now imagine 10 bins. The first bin is for numbers between 1 and 9; the second for numbers between 10 and 19, and so on. The numbers of the bins will be labelled 0 to 9. The bins are the stems. So we just go through all the data and put each datum into its appropriate bin. But we don't have to put the whole of the data into each bin, because the bin number is already numbered with the first digit of the data. So the contents of each bin just contain the second digit of the data. The bins (stems) are lined up in order 0 to 9 and we can also stack their contents so that the single digits are in order inside the bins. These are the leaves. Imagine the bins are made of glass. We can look at the bins and the heights of the stacks of contents. The heights of the contents form a shape as we run down the line of bins. These heights tell us how many data there are in each bin and indicate where the most data is and where the least data is. This is is a frequency distribution. It's the basis of the Stem and Leaf plot and can be represented by a table or chart. Each row of the table starts with the bin number (STEM) and along the row we have the contents of the bin (LEAVES). Turn the table on its side and we have a chart with the stem running along the bottom and the leaves forming towers over the stems. The chart resembles the row of bins with the stack, or column, of contents over them, but the bins are now invisible, and only their labels remain as regular horizontal divisions on the chart. But it doesn't stop there. This frequency chart tells us where most of the data can be found, where its middle is and the general shape of the data. These are important statistical observations. Not all the bins may have data in them, and some will have lots of data. Random data will produce no particular shape, but in many cases there will be a pattern. We've considered numbers from 1 to 99, but the data can have any range as long as the data is binned carefully to reflect the relative magnitude of the data. If the data were between 250 and 400, for example, we might take the first 2 digits as the bin label: 25 to 40 and the contents would be the third digit. So you need to make a decision based on the range of data values to decide how the data is going to be binned. I hope this helps you to understand Stem and Leaf plots.
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how do i do stem and leaf plot in math

Look at your numerical data. What is the highest power of ten (units (ones), tens, hundreds, thousands, millions, etc.)? Now you need to make sure that all the numbers in the dataset are standardised to that highest order. That may mean putting in leading zeroes. So if, for example, you had numbers between 0 and 99 then the highest power of ten is the tens order. If you have a number less than 10, put a zero in front of it, so 7 would be 07. The stem is simply the first digit of the data. So in this case you may have stems 0-9 representing the tens place. The remaining digits form the leaf. So in your stem and leaf table you put the stems at the beginning of each row. These start the horizontal lines of the table: 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. Now put in the leaves filling up cells along the rows. So, for example, 07 would be in the first row, stem 0. It would occupy the next cell on the right of the stem. If you had, for example, 23 and 29 in your dataset, you would go to row stem 2 and put 3 and 9 in adjacent cells. Fill the table with your data just as it comes. The placement of the leaves forms a shape. There are more cells filled for some stem rows and they project further to the right than stems with fewer leaves. This is a frequency plot. Now tidy up the table be arranging the leaf cells into numerical order along the lines starting with the smallest. This makes the plot more useful to draw information from. If the data has a large range, the stems could be, for example, all the numbers between 0 and 49, 50-99, 100-149, etc. The same principle applies. You just put in the whole data for the stems along the stem rows. But usually you will find that the first digit idea is the most common one for stem and leaf plots. Think of the stem and leaf idea as a filing cabinet. Just as you might have all folders for subjects beginning with A in a drawer marked A, folders for B-subjects in a drawer marked B and so on, all in alphabetical order in their own drawers, you can think of each drawer as a stem row. The filing cabinet can be thought of as the stem and leaf plot where the contents of each drawer are the leaves. Some drawers will contain more folders (leaves) than others. If your filing cabinet were made of glass you would be able to see which drawers contained the most folders and which the least. Stem and leaf plots use numerical ordering and this is similar to alphabetical ordering in a filing cabinet or library catalogue.
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What is a stem and leaf plot and when would I use one?

Stem and Leaf plots are just a method of ordering data in a dataset to produce a frequency chart. These plots are used in statistical analysis to draw conclusions about a dataset. The usual way this is done is to use part of each datum to create a data bin. Let's imagine a dataset where all the data consists of numbers between 1 and 99. It doesn't matter how big the dataset is or if there are duplicates. Now imagine 10 bins. The first bin is for numbers between 1 and 9; the second for numbers between 10 and 19, and so on. The numbers of the bins will be labelled 0 to 9. The bins are the stems. So we just go through all the data and put each datum into its appropriate bin. But we don't have to put the whole of the data into each bin, because the bin number is already numbered with the first digit of the data. So the contents of each bin just contain the second digit of the data. The bins (stems) are lined up in order 0 to 9 and we can also stack their contents so that the single digits are in order inside the bins. These are the leaves. Imagine the bins are made of glass. We can look at the bins and the heights of the stacks of contents. The heights of the contents form a shape as we run down the line of bins. These heights tell us how many data there are in each bin and indicate where the most data is and where the least data is. This is is a frequency distribution. It's the basis of the Stem and Leaf plot and can be represented by a table or chart. Each row of the table starts with the bin number (STEM) and along the row we have the contents of the bin (LEAVES). Turn the table on its side and we have a chart with the stem running along the bottom and the leaves forming towers over the stems. The chart resembles the row of bins with the stack, or column, of contents over them, but the bins are now invisible, and only their labels remain as regular horizontal divisions on the chart. But it doesn't stop there. This frequency chart tells us where most of the data can be found, where its middle is and the general shape of the data. These are important statistical observations. Not all the bins may have data in them, and some will have lots of data. Random data will produce no particular shape, but in many cases there will be a pattern. We've considered numbers from 1 to 99, but the data can have any range as long as the data is binned carefully to reflect the relative magnitude of the data. If the data were between 250 and 400, for example, we might take the first 2 digits as the bin label: 25 to 40 and the contents would be the third digit. So you need to make a decision based on the range of data values to decide how the data is going to be binned. I hope this helps you to understand Stem and Leaf plots.
Read More: ...

when building a stem and leaf plot, do you include the stem if there is no leaf

If the stem is in the range for the whole plot, then, yes, you would include it. If it is outside the range then there's no point in including it. If, for example, all the data was in the range 200 to 849 then you could have a stem based on the first 2 digits of the data: 20 to 84. If there were no data between 500 and 600 you would still include 50 as a stem so that you get a proper picture of the data organisation in the range. But there would be no point in including 10 or 90 as stems because there are no leaves for these stems. 
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A stem and leaf plot asks what is the average of high temperatures recorded?

STEM AND LEAF PLOT (DEGREES C) STEM   L E A F 0 7 7       1 4 7 8 8 9 2 1 2 5 6 6 3 5 9       4 4 6 6 6   5 1 6       Sum for each stem: 0: 14 14 (2) 1: 36 + 5*10=86 (5) 2: 20 + 5*20=120 (5) 3: 14 + 2*30=74 (2) 4: 22 + 4*40=182 (4) 5: 7 + 2*50=107(2) TOTAL: 583 (20) TRUE AVERAGE: 583/20=29.15 MEDIAN (middle value): 25.5 (average of 10th and 11th datum, average from plot). The high temperature region where the temperature peaks at 46C is stem 3, 4, 5 and the average (median) is 46. There are 8 values for stems 3-5. True average is (74+182+107)/8=363/8=45.375, close to the median 46.
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1. The stem and leaf plot below shows the ages (in years) of 12 college students:

whats the answer for this the ages of customers entering a store are 13,20,16,53,41,37,20,21,47,10, and 30. janna plans to make a stem-and-leaf plot to display the data. which stem will have the most leaves?
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suppose there r 15 leafs on a stem and leaf plot, how many values r in the data set


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a data display that plots ones digits as a leaf from the tens digets

The tens digit is the stem in a Stem and Leaf plot.
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STEM AND LEAF PLOT TO SHOW DATA.

STEM AND LEAF PLOT (FREQUENCY DISTRIBUTION) STEM (tens of dollars)   L E A F   ( u n i t s )   0 6 9 9                       1 1 2 2 2 3 3 4 5 5 5 5 7 7 8 2 0 0 5                        
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stem and leaf plot


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